Cinco de Mayo factoids

Cinco de Mayo
With Cinco de Mayo sneaking up on us in the coming weeks, it’s a good time to bone up on the holiday, if not for any other reason than being able to spout some trivia at the many Mexican themed bars across the country. Many Mexican (and even non Mexican) bars do three times their usual business on this day, while selling margarita’s left and right. Margarita’s are the best selling drink for the holiday, so restaurant owners should expect to stock up on plenty of salt! Here’s some more factoids to impress your bar neighbors!

 

  • Cinco de Mayo is NOT Mexican Independence Day, that date is September 16th.It’s actually the anniversary of the Battle of Puebla of 1862, in which an entreanched Mexican army defeated a French army twice their size. Although it was a major blow to the invading French forces, the French managed to win the war and held onto Mexico for a few years.

 

 

  • Cinco de Mayo is not popular in Mexico, in fact the only place that celebrates it is the town of Puebla, where the battle occured over a hundred and fifty years ago! Much like St. Patrick’s day to Ireland, it is pretty much an American holiday at this point!

 

 

  • Traditionally, People celebrated with parades, street parties, mariachi music, dancing. Favorite foods served included tacos, nachos, salsa, and mole poblano.

 

Of course you’ll want some food to go with your drinks! Try to avoid drinking on an empty stomach to steer clear of getting sick! Here’s a few factoids about Mexican food to go with your alcohol!

 

  • The product shipment of frozen Mexican foods produced in the U.S., such as tamales and tortillas, was over 1 hundred million dollars in 2002.

 

 

  • The worth of frozen tamales made in the U.S. shipped in 2002 was nearly fifty million.

 

So there you have it! Be sure to check out Community Restaurants for restaurants celebrating this holiday in the Northeast North Carolina area!

Mole Poblano

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